OSAKA UNIV. CBCMP

OSAKA UNIVERSITY CHEMISTRY - BIOLOGY COMBINED MAJOR PROGRAM

Inorganic Chemistry 3

Outline

Inorganic Chemistry 3 will be an introductory course on Materials Science. The study of materials science provides the basis for understanding material properties with respect to chemistry and atomic structure. Concepts of relationships between mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of inorganic materials will be discussed.

Learning outcomes

At the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Understand why the design of structures in inorganic materials has an impact on its observed properties
  • Identify the different types of structures in inorganic materials
  • Define crystal structures and identify crystal phases
  • Describe the impact of defects of materials at atomic and microstructure scale
  • Explain basic diffusion
  • Explain qualitatively and quantitatively the mechanical, thermal, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties of inorganic materials

Textbook

References:

Materials Science and Engineering (9th Edition)

William D. Callister and David G. Rethwisch

ISBN-10: 1118319222

ISBN-13: 978-1118319222

                                

Shriver & Atkins’ Inorganic Chemistry (5th Edition).

Peter Atkins, Tina Overton, Jonathan Rourke, Mark Weller and Fraser Armstrong.

ISBN: 978-0-19-923617-6

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Syllabus

Introduction to Materials Science

Atomic structure

Atomic bonding in solids

Structure of Materials

Crystal structures

Crystallographic points, directions, and planes

Crystalline and non-crystalline materials

Metallic crystal structures

Ceramic crystal structures

X-ray diffraction: determination of crystal structures

Polymer structures

Imperfections in solids

Point defects

Miscellaneous imperfections

Diffusion

Mechanical Properties of Metals

Stress and strain

Elastic deformation

Plastic deformation

Hardness

Thermal Properties

Heat capacity

Thermal expansion

Thermal conductivity

Thermal stress

Electric, Magnetic, and Optical Properties

Electrical conduction

Semiconductivity

Dielectric behavior

Types of magnetism

Optical properties of metals and non-metals

 

This syllabus is meant to be a guide and was made to provide an overview for the course. However, circumstances may require some changes to be made during the span of the semester. In such case, students will be notified if there will be any changes made to the syllabus.

Grading

For Lecture Class:

         Exams                            90%

         Attendance                   10%

 

For Exercise Class:

         Short Quizzes                30%

         Exercises                        60%

         Attendance                    10%

Instructor

Assistant Professor

Christian David Cruz Pangilinan

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